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Music | cymVolon

Archive for the ‘Music’ Category

Octoechos

Cherubic Hymn: 1st mode, maqam saba (Octoechos)

The Cherubikon, or Cherubic Hymn, is the troparion normally sung at the Great Entrance during the Byzantine liturgy. The hymn is sung in the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches.

New-Age Music

New-Age Music: Orpheus and Eurydice

“Orpheus and Eurydice” is a poem by Anna Morfidou, that was set to music by Charis Trasanis. The composition has influences from the known Greek myth where, according to the plot, Orpheus travels to the underworld and by employing the power of his music, softens the hearts of Hades and Persephone, in order to allow [...]

Byzantine Music

Musicology: Neobyzantine Octoechos

In a modified form the octoechos is still regarded as the foundation of the tradition of monodic Orthodox chant today, known as Neobyzantine Octoechos. From a Phanariot point of view, the re-formulation of the Octoechos and its melodic models according to the New Method was neither a simplification of the Byzantine tradition nor an adaption [...]

Byzantine Music - Mystras

Musicology: Papadic Octoechos

Papadic Octoechos exists until the 18th century. Until 1204 neither the Hagia Sophia nor any other cathedral of the Byzantine Empire did abandon its habits, and the Hagiopolitan eight mode system came into use not earlier than in the mixed rite of Constantinople, after the patriarchate and the court had returned from their exile in [...]

Byzantine Music Theme

Musicology: Hagiopolitan Octoechos

The Octoechos as a liturgical concept which established an organization of the calendar into eight-week cycles, was the invention of monastic hymnographers at Mar Saba in Palestine and in Constantinople. It was formally accepted in the Quinisext Council of 692, which also aimed to replace the exegetic poetry of the kontakion and other homiletic poetry, [...]

Octoechos

Musicology: Octoechos

Oktōēchos (here transcribed “Octoechos”; Greek: ὁ Ὀκτώηχος [okˈtóixos]; from ὀκτώ “eight” and ἦχος “sound, mode” called echos; Slavonic: Осмогласие, Osmoglasie from о́смь “eight” and гласъ, Glagolitic: ⰳⰾⰰⱄⱏ, “voice, sound”) is the name of the eight-mode system used for the composition of religious chant in Byzantine, Syrian, Coptic, Armenian, Georgian, Latin and Slavic churches since the [...]

New-Age Music

New-Age Music (Greece)

New-Age Music is defined more by the effect or feeling it produces rather than the instruments used in its creation; it may be electronic, acoustic, or a mixture of both. New-age artists range from solo or ensemble performances using classical-music instruments ranging from the piano, acoustic guitar, flute or harp to electronic musical instruments, or [...]

New-Age Music

New-Age Music (Index)

New-Age Music is defined more by the effect or feeling it produces rather than the instruments used in its creation; it may be electronic, acoustic, or a mixture of both. New-age artists range from solo or ensemble performances using classical-music instruments ranging from the piano, acoustic guitar, flute or harp to electronic musical instruments, or [...]

Daniel of Tyrnavos

Profile: Daniel of Tyrnavos

Daniel was from Tyrnavos in Thessaly. His birth must have occurred in the first decade of the 18th century. It remains, for the time being, unclear how he moved from Tyrnavos to Constantinople. In Constantinople, Daniel studied with cantor Panagiotes Haladzoglou († 1748). Daniel served the Great Church of Christ as a Domestikos (the older [...]

Octoechos

Hymn to the Thrice-Holy: 1st Mode (Octoechos)

When the Trisagion is sung during the Divine Liturgy of the Byzantine Rite, before the Prokeimenon of the Gospel that precedes the Epistle reading, it is normally sung three times to one of many melodies composed for it. This is followed by singing Glory… Now…, the second half of the Trisagion once, and finally

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