Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/cymworld/domains/cymvolon.com/public_html/news/wp-content/plugins/paged-comments/paged-comments.php on line 31

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/cymworld/domains/cymvolon.com/public_html/news/wp-content/plugins/paged-comments/paged-comments.php:31) in /home/cymworld/domains/cymvolon.com/public_html/news/wp-content/plugins/qtranslate/qtranslate_core.php on line 71

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/cymworld/domains/cymvolon.com/public_html/news/wp-content/plugins/paged-comments/paged-comments.php:31) in /home/cymworld/domains/cymvolon.com/public_html/news/wp-includes/feed-rss2.php on line 8
cymVolon http://cymvolon.com/news official site of cymVolon Ltd Mon, 06 Jun 2016 16:26:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.4.2 Cherubic Hymn: 1st mode, maqam saba (Octoechos) http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/11/cherubic-hymn-1st-mode-maqam-saba-octoechos/ http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/11/cherubic-hymn-1st-mode-maqam-saba-octoechos/#comments Sat, 15 Nov 2014 17:30:00 +0000 Charis Trasanis http://cymvolon.com/news/?p=7598 The Cherubikon, or Cherubic Hymn, is the troparion normally sung at the Great Entrance during the Byzantine liturgy. The hymn is sung in the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. The hymn symbolically incorporates those present at the liturgy into the presence of the angels gathered around God’s throne. source: wikipedia.org

index: Byzantine Music, Divine Liturgy / Mass


Music Videos:

Composer: Charis Trasanis“Cherubic Hymn” (maqam saba), first mode
Soloist:

Protopsaltis George Kossenas


The chanter’s of the choir are:

Charis Trasanis

George Kossenas

Charalampos Kalapanidas

Polycarp Tympas


Recorded in November 2014.

Music Scores:

Byzantine notation
“Cherubic Hymn” 
(maqam saba)-first mode
Western notation
“Cherubic Hymn” 
(maqam saba)-first mode
]]>
http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/11/cherubic-hymn-1st-mode-maqam-saba-octoechos/feed/ 1
New-Age Music: Orpheus and Eurydice http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/new-age-music-orpheus-and-eurydice/ http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/new-age-music-orpheus-and-eurydice/#comments Sun, 12 Oct 2014 12:50:16 +0000 Charis Trasanis http://cymvolon.com/news/?p=7529 Orpheus and Eurydice” is a poem by Anna Morfidou, that was set to music by Charis Trasanis. The composition has influences from the known Greek myth where, according to the plot, Orpheus travels to the underworld and by employing the power of his music, softens the hearts of Hades and Persephone, in order to allow Eurydice to return with him back to earth. But all that on one condition: that he should walk in front of her and never look back until they both reach the upper world.
The concert “En Archin en o Eros” took place at the international artistic center and conservatory Athenaeum on March 29, 2014.  source: wikipedia

index: Music


composer: Charis Trasanis
lyrics, soprano: Anna Morfidou
choir: Maria Mallatou, Myrto Goutou, Sozon Giorgou and Antifoniko melos
piano: Ioannis Tsanakaliotis
percussion: Panos Vasilonikolos


]]>
http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/new-age-music-orpheus-and-eurydice/feed/ 1
Musicology: Neobyzantine Octoechos http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/musicology-neobyzantine-octoechos/ http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/musicology-neobyzantine-octoechos/#comments Thu, 09 Oct 2014 11:24:33 +0000 Francois Pier http://cymvolon.com/news/?p=7500 In a modified form the octoechos is still regarded as the foundation of the tradition of monodic Orthodox chant today, known as Neobyzantine Octoechos.

From a Phanariot point of view, the re-formulation of the Octoechos and its melodic models according to the New Method was neither a simplification of the Byzantine tradition nor an adaption to Western tonality and its method of an heptaphonic solfeggio, just based on one tone system (σύστημα κατὰ ἑπταφωνίαν). Quite the opposite, as a universal approach to music traditions of the Mediterranean it was rather based on the integrative power of the psaltic art and the Papadike, which can be traced back to the Hagiopolitan Octoechos and its exchange with Oriental music traditions since more than thousand years.

Hence, the current article is divided into three parts. The first is a discussion of the current solfeggio method based on seven syllables in combination with the invention of a universal notation system which transcribed the melos in the very detail (Chrysanthos’ Theoretikon mega). The second and third part are based on a theoretical separation between the exoteric and the esoteric use of modern or Neobyzantine notation. “External” (ἐξωτερική) music meant the transcription of patriotic songs, opera arias, traditional music of the Mediterrean including Ottoman makam and Persian music, while “internal” (ἐσωτερική) pointed at the papadic tradition of using Round notation with the modal signatures of the eight modes, now interpreted as a simple pitch key without implying any cadential patterns of a certain echos. In practice there had never been such a rigid separation between exoteric and esoteric among Romaic musicians, certain exchanges—with makam traditions in particular—were rather essential for the redefinition of Byzantine Chant, at least according to the traditional chant books published as “internal music” by the teachers of the New Music School of the Patriarchate.  source: wikipedia.org

index: Musicology, Byzantine Music, Octoechos


Part of trilogy:


]]>
http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/musicology-neobyzantine-octoechos/feed/ 0
Musicology: Papadic Octoechos http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/musicology-papadic-octoechos/ http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/musicology-papadic-octoechos/#comments Wed, 08 Oct 2014 08:42:31 +0000 Francois Pier http://cymvolon.com/news/?p=7498 Papadic Octoechos exists until the 18th century. Until 1204 neither the Hagia Sophia nor any other cathedral of the Byzantine Empire did abandon its habits, and the Hagiopolitan eight mode system came into use not earlier than in the mixed rite of Constantinople, after the patriarchate and the court had returned from their exile in Nikaia in 1261.

In the history of the Byzantine rite the Hagiopolitan reform was described as a synthesis of the cathedral rite and the monastic rite. Nevertheless, the Hagiopolitan octoechos did not come into use at the Hagia Sophia of Constantinople before the Papadic reform during the late 13th and the 14th century, after the patriarchate and the court had returned from exile in Nicaea. The reform of John Koukouzeles can be studied by a new type of treatise called “papadike” (παπαδικὴ). It included a list of all neume signs which were taken from various chant books and their different notation systems. In the school of John Glykys this list had been organized as a didactic chant called Mega Ison which passed through all the eight echoi of the octoechos, while the singers memorize the signs and studied their effect in chant composition. This chant or exercise (μάθημα) had been invented by John Glykys, but most papadikai also add a second version in the redaction of John Koukouzeles who was probably his student. These lists prefer the use of Byzantine round notation, which had developed during the late 12th century from the late diastematic Coislin type. The modal signatures were referred to the Hagiopolitan octoechos. Because the repertoire of signs was expanded under the influence of John Glykys’ school, there was a scholarly discussion to make a distinction between Middle and Late Byzantine notation. The discussion decided more or less against this distinction, because the Papadic school did not invent new neume signs, it rather integrated signs known from other chant books and their local traditions, including the books of the Constantinopolitan cathedral rite as they had been used until the Western conquest of Constantinople.  source: wikipedia.org

index: Musicology, Byzantine Music, Octoechos


Part of trilogy:


]]>
http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/musicology-papadic-octoechos/feed/ 1
Musicology: Hagiopolitan Octoechos http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/musicology-hagiopolitan-octoechos/ http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/musicology-hagiopolitan-octoechos/#comments Tue, 07 Oct 2014 09:05:47 +0000 Francois Pier http://cymvolon.com/news/?p=7496 The Octoechos as a liturgical concept which established an organization of the calendar into eight-week cycles, was the invention of monastic hymnographers at Mar Saba in Palestine and in Constantinople. It was formally accepted in the Quinisext Council of 692, which also aimed to replace the exegetic poetry of the kontakion and other homiletic poetry, as it was sung during the morning service (Orthros) of the cathedrals.

One reason, why another eight mode system was established by Frankish reformers during the Carolingian reform, was probably, that Pope Adrian I accepted the seventh-century Eastern reform for the Western Church as well during the 787 synod. The only evidence is an abbreviated chant book called “tonary”. It was simply a list of incipits of chants ordered according to the intonation formula of each church tone and its psalmody. Later also fully notated and theoretical tonaries had been written.

The Byzantine book Octoechos has originally been part of the sticherarion. It was one of the first hymn books with musical notation and its earliest copies survived from the 10th century. Its redaction follows the Studites reform, during which the sticherarion has been invented.  source: wikipedia.org

index: Musicology, Byzantine Music, Octoechos


Part of trilogy:


]]>
http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/musicology-hagiopolitan-octoechos/feed/ 3
Musicology: Octoechos http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/musicology-octoechos/ http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/musicology-octoechos/#comments Mon, 06 Oct 2014 07:55:12 +0000 Francois Pier http://cymvolon.com/news/?p=7509 Oktōēchos (here transcribed “Octoechos”; Greek: ὁ Ὀκτώηχος [okˈtóixos]; from ὀκτώ “eight” and ἦχος “sound, mode” called echos; Slavonic: Осмогласие, Osmoglasie from о́смь “eight” and гласъ, Glagolitic: ⰳⰾⰰⱄⱏ, “voice, sound”) is the name of the eight-mode system used for the composition of religious chant in Byzantine, Syrian, Coptic, Armenian, Georgian, Latin and Slavic churches since the Middle Ages. In a modified form the octoechos is still regarded as the foundation of the tradition of monodic Orthodox chant today. source: wikipedia.org

index: Musicology


System:


]]>
http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/musicology-octoechos/feed/ 1
New-Age Music (Greece) http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/new-age-music-greece/ http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/new-age-music-greece/#comments Sun, 05 Oct 2014 03:24:29 +0000 Charis Trasanis http://cymvolon.com/news/?p=7521 New-Age Music is defined more by the effect or feeling it produces rather than the instruments used in its creation; it may be electronic, acoustic, or a mixture of both. New-age artists range from solo or ensemble performances using classical-music instruments ranging from the piano, acoustic guitar, flute or harp to electronic musical instruments, or from Eastern instruments such as the sitar, tabla, and tamboura.
There is a significant overlap of sectors of new-age music, ambient music, classical music, jazz, electronica, world music, chillout, space music and others.  source: wikipedia

index: New-Age Music


Music Video:


]]>
http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/new-age-music-greece/feed/ 0
New-Age Music (Index) http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/new-age-music-index/ http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/new-age-music-index/#comments Sun, 05 Oct 2014 01:41:48 +0000 Francois Pier http://cymvolon.com/news/?p=7555 New-Age Music is defined more by the effect or feeling it produces rather than the instruments used in its creation; it may be electronic, acoustic, or a mixture of both. New-age artists range from solo or ensemble performances using classical-music instruments ranging from the piano, acoustic guitar, flute or harp to electronic musical instruments, or from Eastern instruments such as the sitar, tabla, and tamboura.
There is a significant overlap of sectors of new-age music, ambient music, classical music, jazz, electronica, world music, chillout, space music and others.  source: wikipedia

index: Music


Music Video:


]]>
http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/new-age-music-index/feed/ 12
Profile: Daniel of Tyrnavos http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/profile-daniel-of-tyrnavos/ http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/profile-daniel-of-tyrnavos/#comments Sat, 04 Oct 2014 09:26:16 +0000 Charis Trasanis http://cymvolon.com/news/?p=7199 Daniel was from Tyrnavos in Thessaly. His birth must have occurred in the first decade of the 18th century. It remains, for the time being, unclear how he moved from Tyrnavos to Constantinople. In Constantinople, Daniel studied with cantor Panagiotes Haladzoglou († 1748). Daniel served the Great Church of Christ as a Domestikos (the older known mention is from 1734), a Lampadarios (older known mention in 1740) and a Protopsaltes (since 1770, when he succeeded John from Trebizond). In the codex Xeropotamou 318 (an autograph by archdeacon Nikephoros Kantouniares from Chios at the beginning of the 19th century), where Daniel is mentioned more periphrastically: Daniel Protopsaltes of the Great Church, student of Panagiotes Haladzoglou, in the 17th century the only one with profound knowledge of music and the only one who excelled at the composite lessons. The contact of Daniel with Zakharias Khanendeh created an interesting “musical interaction”.

On June the 15th of the year 1770, according to the testimony of a deacon named Ananias, preserved in codex Gregoriou 37, fol. 17v: “In the year 1770, on June the 15th, in a horrible fire that broke on Wednesday morning, the house of Daniel the Protopsaltes, in the Phanar, was completely burned. I register this for the readers to remember.” Βy Chrysanthos from Madyta, we know exactly the time, date and year of Daniel’s death. Ιn 1789, 23 December, Saturday at 12 o’clock.

comments: Charis Trasanis

index: Profile


Some Works:

  • upcoming

]]>
http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/10/profile-daniel-of-tyrnavos/feed/ 0
Hymn to the Thrice-Holy: 1st Mode (Octoechos) http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/01/hymn-to-the-thrice-holy-1st-mode-octoechos/ http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/01/hymn-to-the-thrice-holy-1st-mode-octoechos/#comments Fri, 10 Jan 2014 20:07:32 +0000 Charis Trasanis http://cymvolon.com/news/?p=7436 When the Trisagion is sung during the Divine Liturgy of the Byzantine Rite, before the Prokeimenon of the Gospel that precedes the Epistle reading, it is normally sung three times to one of many melodies composed for it. This is followed by singing Glory… Now…, the second half of the Trisagion once, and finally the whole Trisagion a fourth time:

Holy God, Holy [and] Mighty, Holy [and] Immortal, Have mercy on us. (3 times)
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, both now and ever and to the ages of ages. Amen.
Holy and Immortal, have mercy on us.
Holy God, Holy and Mighty, Holy and Immortal, Have mercy on us.

source: wikipedia

index: Church MusicDivine Liturgy / Mass


Music Videos:

Composer: Charis Trasanis“Hymn to the Thrice-Holy” 1st mode
Soloist:
Protopsaltis Periklis Asimakopoulos


The chanter’s of the choir are:
Charis Trasanis
Charalampos Kalapanidas
Christos Goutsoulas


Recorded in June 2014.

Music Scores:

Byzantine notation
“Hymn to the Thrice-Holy” 1st mode
Western notation
“Hymn to the Thrice-Holy” 1st mode
]]>
http://cymvolon.com/news/2014/01/hymn-to-the-thrice-holy-1st-mode-octoechos/feed/ 1