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Βυζαντινή | cymVolon

Posts Tagged ‘Βυζαντινή’

Octoechos

Cherubic Hymn: 1st mode, maqam saba (Octoechos)

The Cherubikon, or Cherubic Hymn, is the troparion normally sung at the Great Entrance during the Byzantine liturgy. The hymn is sung in the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches.

Byzantine Music

Musicology: Neobyzantine Octoechos

In a modified form the octoechos is still regarded as the foundation of the tradition of monodic Orthodox chant today, known as Neobyzantine Octoechos. From a Phanariot point of view, the re-formulation of the Octoechos and its melodic models according to the New Method was neither a simplification of the Byzantine tradition nor an adaption [...]

Byzantine Music - Mystras

Musicology: Papadic Octoechos

Papadic Octoechos exists until the 18th century. Until 1204 neither the Hagia Sophia nor any other cathedral of the Byzantine Empire did abandon its habits, and the Hagiopolitan eight mode system came into use not earlier than in the mixed rite of Constantinople, after the patriarchate and the court had returned from their exile in [...]

Byzantine Music Theme

Musicology: Hagiopolitan Octoechos

The Octoechos as a liturgical concept which established an organization of the calendar into eight-week cycles, was the invention of monastic hymnographers at Mar Saba in Palestine and in Constantinople. It was formally accepted in the Quinisext Council of 692, which also aimed to replace the exegetic poetry of the kontakion and other homiletic poetry, [...]

Octoechos

Musicology: Octoechos

Oktōēchos (here transcribed “Octoechos”; Greek: ὁ Ὀκτώηχος [okˈtóixos]; from ὀκτώ “eight” and ἦχος “sound, mode” called echos; Slavonic: Осмогласие, Osmoglasie from о́смь “eight” and гласъ, Glagolitic: ⰳⰾⰰⱄⱏ, “voice, sound”) is the name of the eight-mode system used for the composition of religious chant in Byzantine, Syrian, Coptic, Armenian, Georgian, Latin and Slavic churches since the [...]

Daniel of Tyrnavos

Profile: Daniel of Tyrnavos

Daniel was from Tyrnavos in Thessaly. His birth must have occurred in the first decade of the 18th century. It remains, for the time being, unclear how he moved from Tyrnavos to Constantinople. In Constantinople, Daniel studied with cantor Panagiotes Haladzoglou († 1748). Daniel served the Great Church of Christ as a Domestikos (the older [...]

Octoechos

Hymn to the Thrice-Holy: 1st Mode (Octoechos)

When the Trisagion is sung during the Divine Liturgy of the Byzantine Rite, before the Prokeimenon of the Gospel that precedes the Epistle reading, it is normally sung three times to one of many melodies composed for it. This is followed by singing Glory… Now…, the second half of the Trisagion once, and finally

Thrice Holy

Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom: Hymn to the Thrice-Holy

The Trisagion (Greek: Τρισάγιον “Thrice Holy“), sometimes called by its opening line Agios O Theos, is a standard hymn of the Divine Liturgy in most of the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Catholic churches. The Latin name Tersanctus or Ter Sanctus is sometimes used to refer to this hymn, although this name is also [...]

Iakovos Nafpliotis

Profile: Iakovos Nafpliotis

Iakovos Nafpliotis, (or Nafpliotes or Naupliotis or Naupliotes: Greek: Ἰάκωβος Ναυπλιώτης) (Naxos, 1864 – Athens, December 5, 1942) was the Archon Protopsaltis (First cantor) of the Holy and Great Church of Christ at Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey). Iakovos Nafpliotis is one of the first cantor to have ever been recorded; many people also regard him being [...]

Nileas Kamarados

Profile: Nileas Kamarados

Nileas Kamarados was born in Bosporus in 1847. He died in Istanbul in 1922. His Father Antonis and his grandfather Constantinos escaped the massacre of Chios and set up a trading empire in Russia. They later returned to Asia Minor. He was an influential cantor in byzantine music and invented his own notational system based [...]

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